ACCRA ACADEMY ALUMNI

 

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THE SCHOOL CREST

THE LION:
King of Beasts. It represents the Lion of Justice explemplifying poise and controlled power.
THE SUN:
This represents the brilliance of knowledge, dispersing ignorance and superstition.
THE THREE CHAINS:
The union of three chains stands for the Pauline virtues of Faith, Hope and Love.
THE PALM TREE:
The palm tree thrives where other trees can hardly stand. Here it represents Triumph over environmental handicaps.
COCOA TREE:
Symbol of Ghana's wealth. It means the proper use of wealth to sweeten the cares of life.

THE SCHOOL MOTTO:
Esse Quam Videri

translated as
"To be, rather than to seem."

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Foundation Lectures PAGE


Welcome to Accra Academy Alumni Web site!!!!!      Esse Quam Videri - To be, rather than to seem.!!!!!                Accra Aca Bleooo!!!!!!!!


Prof. Quainoo on the importance of affordable universal education, and good governance.


Dr. Samuel Quainoo Delivers The Foundation Lectures During The 75th Anniversary Celebration Of Accra Academy in Ghana in July 2006.

As Ghana approaches its fiftieth anniversary, in March 2007, as the first independent black African nation, Dr. Quainoo, who has written several books and articles on Africa, finds reasons to celebrate the country’s accomplishments as well as to express concern about developing trends on the continent.

He asserts the importance of equal access to education in an era when the World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF) exert pressure on Ghana to privatize education to reduce public expenditures. Dr. Quainoo, who is also conducting a study to determine the social consequences of privatized education over the last ten years in Ghana, expressed apprehension about the potential for social strife, as the gap between educated elites and low income groups is likely to widen.



“Africa has one of the widest gaps in income among its citizens, and any policy that reinforces this trend has to be examined critically,” says Dr. Quainoo. “The strong correlation between wide income gaps and levels of social strife in developing societies cannot be ignored. The possible unintended social consequence of such aggressive privatization programs may do more harm than good in the long run.”

Dr. Quainoo called for a pragmatic public/private partnerships in the educational and other sectors to reduce government expenditures and to retain equal access and opportunities for all.

Quainoo’s speech was one of the annual Foundation lectures given in memory of the founding fathers of the Accra Academy. Previous speakers—and former students there—include the last two Speakers of Ghana’s Parliament, and the immediate past Chief Justice of Ghana’ s Supreme Court.



Countering international pressure on Ghana to privatize education, East Stroudsburg University Associate Professor of Political Science, Dr. Samuel Quainoo, spoke there recently on the importance of affordable universal education, and good governance. The speech was given on the occasion of the 75th anniversary of the esteemed Accra Academy in Ghana, a high school where many Ghanaians who have risen to prominence were educated.

Dr. Quainoo is writing his third book on development challenges in Africa; planning an international colloquium in Ghana for politicians and academics to commemorate the 50th Independence Anniversary; and working on his charitable organization, which funds ten orphans at the Kpando Orphanage and twenty students at Unity Junior Secondary School and Baifi Krom Junior Secondary school, all in Ghana. Dr. Quainoo’s other books include Transitions and Consolidation of Democracy in Africa (2000) and Africa Through Ghanaian Lenses (2004).


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